David Louis Edelman David Louis Edelman

Archive for the ‘Book Reviews’ Category

« Newer Entries Older Entries »

  1. T. Coraghessan Boyle’s “The Tortilla Curtain”  • 
    This book review was originally published on Critics’ Choice on October 18, 1995. Through the course of five novels and four short story collections, T. Coraghessan Boyle has proven himself an extraordinary (if erratic) satirist. His disdain for the politically correct and his peculiar sense of humor have propelled some spectacular successes (The Road to […]
  2. Frederick Barthelme’s “Painted Desert”  • 
    "Painted Desert," Frederick Barthelme's sixth novel and a pseudo-sequel to his acclaimed "The Brothers," offers a thoughtful road trip through the psyche of America. Barthelme has plugged in to the currents of frustration that run through us all these days and provided us with some much-needed grounding.
  3. Philip Roth’s “Sabbath’s Theater”  • 
    After decade or two of metaphysical tricks and postmodern identity crises, with "Sabbath's Theater" Philip Roth has finally gotten back around to what he does best: offending people.
  4. Edwidge Danticat’s “Krik? Krak!”  • 
    Writing in spare, elegant language, Danticat's "Krik? Krak!" is a moving testimonial of man's inhumanity to man — especially man's inhumanity to woman — that you cannot leave untouched. Moving beyond the frustratingly ephemeral considerations of presidential politics, Danticat's poetry of pain is an indelible portrait.
  5. Richard Ford’s “Independence Day”  • 
    With its Proustian pace and its wide thematic territory, Richard Ford's "Independence Day" is, if anything, a better book than its predecessor, "The Sportswriter." You can't ask for much more in summer reading: a thick, absorbing narrative that quietly slides into profundity and social critique without your even noticing.
  6. Martin Amis’ “The Information”  • 
    Martin Amis's "The Information" is a novel that's glibly self-conscious about the entire literary publication process, and bitter as horseradish about it, too. It's a novel that's sure to offend, horrify, and amuse anyone that's ever indulged in writing, book reviewing, editing, or publishing.
  7. Stephen Dixon’s “Interstate”  • 
    Stephen Dixon's "Interstate" takes no shortcuts and uses no euphemisms in confronting the dark side of our jarring, claustrophobic, and increasingly violent society. It's a blunt and revelatory look at the anxieties that creep around in our subconscious night after night, and not soon to be forgotten.
  8. Anne Tyler’s “Ladder of Years”  • 
    Anne Tyler's "Ladder of Years" poses an awful lot of tough questions about women's liberation, and Tyler's lack of straight answers is at once artful and irritating.
  9. Michael Chabon’s “Wonder Boys”  • 
    This book review was originally published on Critics’ Choice on July 10, 1995. Three-time novelist Grady Tripp may have lost his writer’s acumen, but his imagination is certainly intact; because it takes a supreme effort of creativity to end up in the massive pickle that Grady, the protagonist of Michael Chabon’s new novel, Wonder Boys, […]
  10. Madison Smartt Bell’s “All Souls’ Rising”  • 
    Once you've waded far enough in, "All Souls' Rising" pulls you away with the tide and gives you a thorough drubbing for the next 400 pages. Along the way Bell provides a fascinating historical panorama of colonial Haiti, and one that reaffirms the author as one of extraordinary scope and talent.

« Newer Entries Older Entries »